Archive for February, 2019

2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films (Part 3 of 3)

Posted in Awards, Documentary, Shorts with tags on February 21, 2019 by Mark Hobin

ShortsTV continues to make all three of the Oscar-nominated short film programs (animated, live action, documentary) available to audiences around the world. To find out where you can watch this year’s Oscar© Nominated Short Films, visit their Theatrical Release and On Demand pages.

Documentary

The documentary short category often relies on certain trends. The Holocaust has historically been a popular subject in this category. Surprisingly, 2019 doesn’t contain a single entry having to do with that theme (neither did 2018 actually).  In fact, the last winning doc to do so was The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life in 2014.

That’s not to say they still can’t be classified. 3 of this year’s finalists [End Game, Lifeboat, and Period. End of Sentence] touch upon humanitarian groups dealing with imperative issues. The other two concern hate groups.

I’ve ranked each one in order from best to worst. In some cases I could have flipped entries next to each other, so don’t get too hung up on the lineup.

 

END GAME
USA/40MINS/2018
Directors: ROB EPSTEIN and JEFFREY FRIEDMAN
end-game
Moving depiction of the final stages of life at two San Francisco Bay Area medical facilities: a hospice and a palliative care center.  Both places comfort and provide for people dealing with end of life decisions.  A handful of patients are profiled.  It’s a poignant examination that forces the audience to deliberate over very difficult choices that we will ultimately have to make some day.  One key doctor B.J. Miller, M.D., is head of the Zen Hospice Project in San Francisco.  He knows a thing or two about tragedy having lost 3 of his own limbs in a freak accident.

 

BLACK SHEEP
UK/27MINS/2018
Director: ED PERKINS
BlackSheep
Looking directly into the camera, Cornelius Walker recounts his childhood as a black teenager growing up in the largely white London suburb of Essex.  Blending his own firsthand account with reenactments, he describes his dealings with the local neighborhood of racist peers.  Rather than combat them, he details his desire to fit in with the reprehensible group.  He becomes like them and his transformation, both physical and mental, is chilling.  The extreme lengths he employed to earn their friendship is unsettling.  Points for honesty though and sympathy for the obviously difficult environment to which he was exposed.

Hard to predict which of these five nominees will ultimately win, but most buzz surrounds this one.

 

LIFEBOAT
USA/34MINS/2018
Director: SKYE FITZGERALD

thenewyorker_lifeboatVolunteers from a German nonprofit called Sea-Watch conduct rescue missions in the Mediterranean off the coast of Libya.  Many of these North African refugees are fleeing to Europe to escape barbarous conditions at a human trafficking prison.  It’s not entirely clear that their life, after being rescued, will be great.  However, at least they are alive in a much better place than before.  The superior cinematography and music are definitely at a higher level than the other submissions.  The visual spectacle of these unsafe vessels overcrowded to the point that people are literally hanging off the sides, is something you won’t soon forget.

 

PERIOD. END OF SENTENCE.
USA/26MINS/2018
Director: RAYKA ZEHTABCHI
period
In a rural village outside Delhi, India, the discussion of feminine hygiene is so taboo that few have access to sanitary pads.  Let’s face it, a documentary about this subject might even be off-putting to some in the U.S.  Interviews suggest that the men in this remote area don’t have a clear understanding of the female reproductive system.  Many women just use an old cloth and discreetly bury it afterward.  We hear personal stories from ladies who have had difficulty pursuing an education or holding a job.  A female-led startup seeks to change all that by producing and selling (it’s a business after all) affordable pads.  A product that Western society takes for granted becomes a major life-changing commodity in the lives of these women.

 

A NIGHT AT THE GARDEN
USA/7MINS/2018
Director: MARSHALL CURRY
German.jpg
Archival film concerning a 1939 rally of Nazi supporters astonishingly held in New York City at Madison Square Garden.  The gathering drew a crowd of 20,000 people in 1939; two years before America began its involvement in World War II.  This frustratingly brief documentary presents jaw-dropping footage inspiring numerous questions.  Much-needed narration would have been appreciated to provide some context.  The throng is addressed by Fritz Kuhn the leader of the German American Bund, a pro-Nazi organization.  This isn’t revealed, but my own curiosity led me to discover that Kuhn was deported in 1945.

02-16-19

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2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films (Part 2 of 3)

Posted in Awards, Drama, Shorts with tags on February 19, 2019 by Mark Hobin

ShortsTV continues to make all three of the Oscar-nominated short film programs (animated, live action, documentary) available to audiences around the world. To find out where you can watch this year’s Oscar© Nominated Short Films, visit their Theatrical Release and On Demand pages.

Live-Action

The Shorts (live-action and documentary specifically) have a reputation for presenting only the most depressing subjects for public consumption.  I’m sorry to say this year is no exception.

The unintended theme is “boys in peril” and – as my friend Jonathan Van Dyke observed – you’re likely to need a therapist after watching all five of these bleak nominees.

I’ve ranked each one in order from best to worst.

 

SKIN
USA/20MINS/2018
Director: GUY NATTIV
skin
This allegorical drama of just desserts plays out like a 1960’s Twilight Zone episode.  The film’s overall subject is the oft detailed theme of racism.  However, this tale is unique in that you initially meet the child’s father through his supportive eyes.  He appears to be a warm and loving parent at first.  Then a fateful encounter reveals the man to have deep-seated personality flaws.  Tales of revenge are morally questionable but they can be cathartic too.  This particular saga is an efficiently told chronicle with an ultimate twist of comeuppance.

 

FAUVE
CANADA/16MINS/2018
Director: JEREMY COMTE
fauve-film-court-metrage-jeremy-comteRather disturbing tale of two boys’ (Félix Grenier and Alexandre Perreault) game of one-upmanship.  Their back and forth play culminates in a shocking event at an open pit mine.  The story ultimately devolves into terrorizing consequences.  It’s one of those portraits detailing behavior that critics conveniently describe as “toxic masculinity”. That assessment is far too facile.   There’s a lot more at work here that begs deep contemplation.   I was shook.

 

MARGUERITE
CANADA/19MINS/2017
Director: MARIANNE FARLEY
margauritte
This is the story of an aging woman who is being taken care of by a younger caregiver. Marguerite comes to learn that her female nurse, Rachel, has a girlfriend. This becomes a stepping off point for our lead to reflect on her life.  She too longs for a woman in her past.  This is a poignant tale.  Particularly interesting because it’s the only nominee that’s uplifting and diverges from the theme of “boys in peril” that defines every other nominee.   Perhaps that’s why pundits have picked this as the odds on favorite to win.

 

MADRE (MOTHER)
SPAIN/19MINS/2017
Director: RODRIGO SOROGOYEN
live_2
A parent’s worst nightmare. The story concerns Iván, Marta’s 7-year-old son, who calls his mother while vacationing at the beach with her ex-husband.  The entire drama takes place over the duration of one phone call, interrupted by a disconnection at one juncture.  We never see the little boy at the other end, but we do see the mother’s response.  Her terror as she comes to realize the intimate danger that her son faces is palpable.  Loses major points for having absolutely no resolution whatsoever.  This feels like a snippet taken out of context from a much longer horror film.  Frustratingly unfinished.

 

DETAINMENTT
IRELAND/30MINS/2018
Director: VINCENT LAMBE
06_B-2
Detainment is far and away the most controversial all the shorts nominees.  Inspired by the real-life Liverpool murder of James Bulger,  it concerns two boys who kidnapped, then subsequently tortured and killed a 2-year-old child in 1993.  The incident was so stomach churning that despite their young age, the assailants were tried and convicted as adults in the UK.  This particular nominee has attracted dubious attention because Denise Fergus, the actual mother of James Bulger, was “disgusted and upset” by this film.  She’s not wrong.   The narrative is tolerant of the antagonists since it is done from their perspective.  The account seeks to solicit sympathy.  The attackers break down and cry as they come to grips with the severity of what they did.  The short itself is not graphic, but if you’re acquainted with the substantive case, the sympathetic point of view to the aggressors’ situation is extremely unsettling.

02-16-19

2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films (Part 1 of 3)

Posted in Animation, Awards, Drama, Shorts on February 18, 2019 by Mark Hobin

ShortsTV continues to make all three of the Oscar-nominated short film programs (animated, live action, documentary) available to audiences around the world.  To find out where you can watch this year’s Oscar© Nominated Short Films, visit their Theatrical Release and On Demand pages.

Animation

Last year Dear Basketball – a fawning piece of hagiography that worshiped at the feet of Kobe Bryant – won.  Even my least favorite of this year is better than that egregious work as far as I’m concerned.  Regardless of who wins, we’re guaranteed to top last year in this category.   That’s good news!  Interestingly 4 of the 5 shorts this year explore the very the same theme: child/parent relationships.  That makes this lot feel kind of samey.  None of them are revolutionary,  but they all still offer modest delights.  I’m a little surprised that Bilby, a computer-animated short from DreamWorks Animation, didn’t garner a nomination.  It’s worth checking out.

I’ve ranked each one in order from best to worst.  (They’re all enjoyable.)

 

BAOUSA/8MINS/2018
Director: DOMEE SHI
bao-rgb-s110_19c.pub16.172_wide-fac99c3e9c47382001ee1db485313d5fe8a4a35f-s800-c85 (1)
Pixar is on a roll.  They’ve received a nomination every year since 2015’s Sanjay’s Super Team. Their annual tradition continues with their first female-directed short.  This was originally shown right before Incredibles 2 so if you’ve seen at least one of these nominees, chances are it’s this one.  This is an amiable little delight that details a mother’s love for her son and her resulting feelings when he leaves home.  Back in June 2018 when I first saw it, I didn’t’ fully grasp the allegorical nature of this account, but over time it has gradually grown on me.  I now understand it as a depiction of “empty nest syndrome”.  Given it’s from Pixar, you already know it’s visually stunning.  Even comprehensive food research went into depicting the art of dumpling making.   My most treasured of the five nominees and also my pick for the likely winner.

 

WEEKENDS
USA/15MINS/2007
Director: TREVOR JIMENEZ
Weekends
The story of a little boy who must divide his time between his recently divorced parents. Weekdays are with mother in Ontario.  Weekends are with his father in Toronto.  Director Trevor Jimenez draws on his own childhood.  His unique take clearly has the authenticity of someone who has actually lived through this experience.  That’s not to say the other nominees don’t as well, but his approach to this subject is especially unique.  We get a really nice depth into the life of each parent.

 

LATE AFTERNOON
IRELAND/10MINS/2017
Director: LOUISE BAGNALL
Late
Profile of an elderly woman (voiced by actress Fionnula Flanagan) who copes with dementia.  There’s also room for the adult daughter that cares for her.  The production comes from Kilkenny-based Cartoon Saloon who brought us the feature films The Secret of Kells, Song of the Sea and The Breadwinner.   All three are beautifully animated gems.  It’s a touching – if simplistic – portrait.   Memories of the past can often be recalled by way of their association to day-to-day occurrences in the present.  This chronicle has a moving conclusion.

 

ONE SMALL STEP
USA & CHINA/8MINS/2018
Directors: ANDREW CHESWORTH and BOBBY PONTILLAS
Srep
Produced by Taiko Studios, this is the story of a father and his daughter who longs to explore space by becoming an astronaut.  Little girl Luna and her loving father Chu have a close relationship that’s worth celebrating.   It’s a saccharine sweet connection for people who like extra syrup, powdered sugar and chocolate sprinkles with their pancakes.

 

ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR
CANADA/14MINS/2018
Directors: ALISON SNOWDEN and DAVID FINE
Animal
This was released in French as Zoothérapie and that’s actually a more clever title.  This is the only one not about children.   Interesting – albeit meandering – take on animals visiting the psychiatrist in a group therapy session.  They seek to rid themselves of innate behaviors that have become a problem in their lives.  For example, a praying mantis can’t keep a man because she eats her mates.  Some chuckle-worthy moments, but it drags after a while.  I suppose the underlying subtext is that we as humans are animals as well.

02-13-19

Alita: Battle Angel

Posted in Action, Adventure, Romance, Science Fiction with tags on February 17, 2019 by Mark Hobin

alita_battle_angel_ver2STARS3.5Alita: Battle Angel is an immersive sci-fi fantasy that plunges the viewer into an imaginary world.  I really enjoyed this production, but no amount of complicated exposition can disguise the fact that it’s essentially a cyberpunk update of 1975’s Rollerball.  It certainly doesn’t start out that way.  It’s the future (naturally) – 2563 to be exact and a cyberphysician (Christoph Waltz) who repairs people with android parts discovers the discarded remains of a female robot in a junkyard.  He takes the head, which houses a still active brain, back to his laboratory and rebuilds her.  He names her Alita, after his deceased daughter.  She is of youthful age and this only cements the fatherly attachment he forms to her well being.

Alita: Battle Angel is based on Yukito Kishiro’s manga series Gunnm. The titular cyborg is portrayed by Rosa Salazar.  The actress is in her thirties but she is made to look like a teenager here.  Her appearance is actually a mix of CGI and human performance.  With her somewhat vacant uncharacteristically wide eyes, she resembles a Margaret Keane painting.  She’s got a spark to her personality though.  Her burgeoning attraction to Hugo (Keean Johnson) is more captivating than what you’d expect out of the obligatory love interest role he fulfills.   Hugo also functions as her introduction to this gladiator-style game called Motorball which is a mishmash of football, basketball, and roller derby.  Turns out Alita has quite the talent for the game.

This is fundamentally a martial arts/sci-fi B-movie but it’s given vibrant life with an A-list cast.  Christoph Waltz is the fatherly Geppetto, er uh I mean Dr. Dyson Ido, a cybernetics mastermind.  The seemingly ageless Jennifer Connelly is his ex-wife Chiren, who now works for a nefarious businessman named Vector played by Mahershala Ali.  Fashion-wise he makes a very strong case for a Blade reboot.  Vector hires malevolent cyborgs for the Motorball matches in an attempt to kill Alita for reasons I didn’t completely understand.  His identity is somewhat ill-defined.  He’s definitely a villain and that’s apparently what they do in a dystopian society.  CGI is liberally used to re-imagine scenery and in many cases, the actors as well.  Many figures in the movie are a mix of both organic and fabricated elements.  Ed Skrein, Jackie Earle Haley, Jorge Lendeborg Jr., Jeff Fahey, Edward Norton, Michelle Rodriguez, and Jai Courtney all appear.  Some more recognizably human than others.

The screenplay by James Cameron (Avatar) and Laeta Kalogridis (Shutter Island) is fairly standard issue.  When good people do bad things – that’s the level of innovation.  A few characters have this moment.  At times, the narrative morphs in needlessly convoluted ways that are uninteresting.  The crux of the plot is about playing a futuristic sport.  The lively action consistently returns to Motorball time and again, even ending at the arena.  There’s nothing wrong with that.  There’s artistic value in simplicity.  Alita manages to recall both Frankenstein and Pinocchio by way of creating life from a once lifeless body.  This is a story for children.  Director Robert Rodriguez was responsible for Spy Kids and this should charm the same audience.  However, the writers still felt the need to throw in one, and only one, prominent use of the F-word.  The visuals are fun as you’d expect when James Cameron is the producer.  The classic battle of good vs. evil is presented under a pretty veneer of special effects and charismatic actors.   There’s a pure joy here and with a little judicious editing, this could’ve been quite spectacular.  As it stands, it’s fitfully entertaining.

02-14-19

The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part

Posted in Action, Adventure, Animation, Comedy on February 9, 2019 by Mark Hobin

lego_movie_two_the_second_part_ver8STARS3If ever there was a shortcut to a “fast” film review, it would be one question, Did you enjoy 2014’s The Lego Movie?  If so, then you should appreciate The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part.  This one was also written by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, although directing chores are now in the hands of Mike Mitchell (Trolls).  It’s another adventure that centers on Emmet (Chris Pratt) and Lucy/Wyldstyle (Elizabeth Banks) who must defend their beloved city.  Mysterious invaders have turned Bricksburg into a post-apocalyptic wasteland.  Batman (Will Arnett), Princess Unikitty (Alison Brie) Benny the Spaceman (Charlie Day) and MetalBeard (Nick Offerman) have all returned in this outing.  They, in addition to Lucy, are taken prisoner by a masked general named Sweet Mayhem (Stephanie Beatriz).  Not a traditional Lego, but rather an intergalactic mini-doll who reports to the enigmatic Queen Watevra Wa-Nabi (Tiffany Haddish).  Phonetically her name sounds like “Whatever-I-Want-To-Be” and that makes sense because she’s an alien queen of constantly shifting shapes.  Still always the plucky spirit, it’s up to Emmet to rescue his friends.

The colorful production is a big loud noisy clutter of sound and images.  There are battles and explosions, along with dinosaurs and spaceships.   The underlying explanation for its nonsensical nature is to mimic the imaginative stories that children make up with their toys.  The first picture was manic too, but there was at least some coherence to the story.   Here, action and dialogue merge in a virtual collage of pandemonium.  I must admit I longed for subtitles on more than one occasion to make sense of the chaos.   This has been done before so granted, the concept doesn’t feel as fresh as its predecessor.  They’ve somehow managed to produce two spinoffs (Batman, Ninjago) in the interim as well – so that’s 4 LEGO movies in 5 years. Obviously, the big reveal at the end of episode one can’t be the same wondrous surprise again.  However clever pop cultural allusions are there amidst all the manic energy.   I did laugh.   Bruce Willis briefly pops up in an amusing cameo.  Comedian Tiffany Haddish is a creative selection to portray the main villain.  Her raspy voice lends an inspired sass to her character.  This is a semi-musical of sorts and she gets to talk-sing her way through two ditties: “Not Evil” and “Gotham City Guys” – both comical musical confections.  So too is “Catchy Song” which features the refrain “This song’s gonna get stuck inside your head” and it probably will.  The narrative is a clever allegory for sibling rivalry.  The obligatory moral, which is so often awkwardly inserted in these kid flicks, feel refreshingly sincere.  Cooperation and getting along never goes out of style.

02-07-19