Archive for April, 2019

Missing Link

Posted in Adventure, Animation, Comedy with tags on April 15, 2019 by Mark Hobin

missing_linkSTARS3Laika needs help.  The studio specializes in fastidiously mounted, exquisitely produced stop-motion animated features.  They receive critical raves but are increasingly ignored at the box office.  Their latest effort debuted at $5.9 million which set a record for the lowest total ever for a film to open on more than 3,200+ screens.  It helps that Laika is owned by Nike founder Phil Knight who has the power to subsidize their efforts.  Knight’s son Travis is President and CEO.  To be fair, their movies have never been huge money makers, but they can turn a profit.  The darkly twisted yet lovely Coraline made a substantial $75 million at the box office in 2009.  Their stop motion technique is liberally enhanced using computer-generated effects and 3D printing.  Some critics have blamed a lack of audience interest on Laika’s approach, but that doesn’t ring true.  The finished product is not dissimilar to Pixar’s or Disney’s computer-animated style.  I admire the meticulous craft that goes into making Laika’s art even when the production doesn’t charm me (The Boxtrolls).  I really want Laika to succeed because they make gorgeous looking pictures.  Missing Link likewise is visually stunning, but overall a relatively low point in their filmography.

The story concerns Sir Lionel Frost (Hugh Jackman), a self-absorbed trailblazer that sets off on a trek of the Pacific Northwest.  He seeks to prove the existence of a legendary primitive man creature.  By doing this he hopes to secure admission into London’s Optimates Club, a group of narrow-minded explorers headed up by the insufferable Lord Piggot-Dunceby (Stephen Fry).  Why Frost so desperately wants to belong to an organization of arrogant snobs is rather baffling.  At any rate, he meets the Sasquatch rather quickly in the forest.  Turns out “Mr. Link” (Zach Galifianakis) as Frost dubs him, is a gentle giant who can talk.  Incidentally, with his tiny beady eyes and large pig nose, the design of the titular beast isn’t appealing.  Honestly, he’s downright ugly.  My unsolicited advice: if your main protagonist is furry and virtuous, make him adorable so kids will want the stuffed animal version.   The two set out to find Mr. Link’s long-lost relatives in the fabled valley of Shangri-La in the Himalayas.  Adelina Fortnight (Zoe Saldana), Frost’s former girlfriend joins the two on their journey.  Her look may mimic the style of the “Gibson Girl” but her contemptuous personality isn’t cute.  Meanwhile, they are pursed by Willard Stenk (Timothy Olyphant) a bounty hunter on a mission to kill Frost.  Apparently, Piggot-Dunceby wants Frost dead so he has no chance of ever joining their group.  I still can’t get past the idea that Frost craves this guy’s acceptance.

Missing Link has its charms but they’re mostly visual.  The adventure has no momentum.  Just a meandering saga highlighting beautifully executed stop motion skills.  The chronicle is lacking a spark of inspiration to bring it to life.  Coraline and ParaNorman both had this audacious quality that entertained through sheer eccentricity.  But Missing Link is much saner and safer.  Frost’s whole purpose to gain admission into this highfalutin society of people who are beneath contempt is just misguided and sad.  The prim Victorian era setting isn’t an atmosphere that’s ripe for laughs.  Unless of course, you find colonialism and stuffy tradition, inherently funny.  Most of the stodgy repartee doesn’t land.  Emma Thompson, as the Yeti Elder Queen gets in a few laconic quips.  ‘Throw them in the Pit of Misery and Perpetual Disappointment!’ and “Shangri-La means, Keep out. We hate you,” are droll lines.  An adult fan of sarcasm might chuckle but it’s not banter that would delight a young child.   Ads for the movie clearly mismarketed this to children when this really should’ve been targeted at teens and adults.  However, the climactic action scene is a real cliffhanger – literally.  It entertains all ages.  The moment energizes with inspired loopiness.  That zany joy is sadly absent from most of the film.  It was a wacky jolt from a tale in desperate need of it.

04-11-19

Advertisements

Pet Sematary

Posted in Horror, Mystery, Thriller with tags on April 8, 2019 by Mark Hobin

pet_sematary_ver3STARS3.5It’s been 30 years.  Pet Cemetery was ripe for a remake.  Oh pardon me, that’s S-E-M-A-T-A-R-Y.  Although a hit in the spring of 1989, the original isn’t held in particularly high regard.  Additionally, author Stephen King has never been hotter.  His novel It was reworked for a second time as two theatrical features in 2017 and 2019.  Even accounting for inflation, Part 1 became the biggest box office success of a Stephen King property ever.  This critic wasn’t a fan actually.  I’d have to go back to 1408 to find something based on the author’s work I enjoyed so I wasn’t highly anticipating this.  I’m happy to say that this is the best Stephen King adaptation in over a decade.

The best horror movies establish an evocative mood.  There’s something really eerie about a burial ground.  A graveyard for animals is even creepier still.  Now add the fact that I’m not a cat person.  Just the set-up of Pet Sematary is inherently scary.  Dr. Louis Creed (Jason Clarke) has relocated his family from Boston to rural Maine.  His wife Rachel (Amy Seimetz) and their youngsters, daughter Ellie (Jeté Laurence), and son Gage (Hugo & Lucas Lavoie) are getting used to their new surroundings.  Their home deep in the woods affords them peace and quiet.  The acres that now make up their backyard also includes a pet cemetery used by the locals.  While out walking one day, Rachel and Ellie come upon a funeral procession of children in frightening animal masks.  One malevolently beats on a toy drum.  The spectacle is even more menacing than it sounds.  When Ellie tries to climb beyond a tangled mass of fallen trees and brush, she is stopped from going any further by the Creeds’ well-meaning new neighbor, Jud Crandall (John Lithgow).  We’re immediately curious about what lays past the deadfall.  The unsettling unknown is often scarier than the actual reveal.

The chronicle relies on an emotional core.  The screenplay doesn’t treat grief as some throwaway concern, but an emotion with which one must come to terms.  We learn early on that mother Rachel was traumatized by the passing of her sister Zelda (Alyssa Brooke Levine).  Death has always been a hard subject for her to talk about.  When the family cat Church is hit by a truck, she decides to hide this detail from the kids and simply say the cat ran away.  Louis and Jud go to bury Church in the established shrine.  However, Jud shares a bit of information with Louis that will change their lives forever.  Pet Sematary is a horror reflection that contemplates bereavement.  Perhaps these harsh realities of life are better to accept than to reject.

This is a simple drama unencumbered by extraneous details.  Matt Greenberg (1408) has slightly changed the story from one of Stephen King’s shorter novels.  This may anger some King purists.  I don’t worship the text so it’s didn’t faze me.  Screenwriter Jeff Buhler (The Prodigy) has adapted the source for directors Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer (Starry Eyes) who take a refreshingly spartan approach to the proceedings.  This is a bare-bones study with effective scares and a chilling atmosphere.  As we’ve recently seen in Hereditary and Us, a performance can greatly enhance a production.  11-year-old actress Jeté Laurence gives a nuanced portrayal.  Ellie Creed is a complex role worthy of an actor twice her age.  Unfortunately, the developments succumb to blood and guts violence in the final act.  I’m not a fan of viscera.  Then again it probably wouldn’t be Stephen King if it didn’t include some.  Thankfully this tale depends more on emotions than gore.  The sophisticated craft is markedly better than the silliness of the 1989 version.  Christopher Young’s ominous score adds to the disturbing milieu.  The ambiance is a mounting wall of impending dread.  I “dug” this Pet Sematary.

04-04-19

Dumbo

Posted in Family, Fantasy with tags on April 1, 2019 by Mark Hobin

dumbo_ver2STARS1.5It takes a special kind of talent to twist an uplifting story and turn it into a depressing slog.  The animated Dumbo (1941) is widely considered one of Disney’s 10 greatest animated films by published critics who make it their business to rank such things.  That’s not my opinion it’s simply a fact.  How director Tim Burton was able to take a heartfelt animated treasure and pervert it into this soulless shell of a disgrace is almost incomprehensible.  For the purposes of this review, however, I’m going to try.

Tim Burton actually worked for Walt Disney as an apprentice animator beginning in1980.  By 1984 he directed a short while there called Frankenweenie.  He was summarily fired by the studio shortly thereafter.  Could this be some sort of pent up anger finally being released decades later?  He’s worked with the studio several times since. That 2010 Alice in Wonderland adaptation isn’t great either but at least it had a modicum of reverence for the source material.  What Burton has accomplished here is the desecration of a classic.  The original was about how an outsider comes to terms with what makes him different and then capitalizing on that supposed weakness.  Dumbo’s big ears became a strength allowing him to triumph over adversity winning the hearts of all those around him.  This aberration of a film marginally runs on the fumes of that idea, but it’s really about something else entirely,

The animated Dumbo (1941) clocked in at a mere 64 minutes.  That’s roughly an hour folks.  Burton’s Dumbo is near twice that length.  Dumbo isn’t told from the perspective of the animals.  None of the critters talk in this version.  Dumbo is a saga about people.  The financial woes of a struggling circus appear to worsen when a newborn baby elephant is born with oversized ears.  Widowed and one-armed horse trainer Holt Farrier (Colin Farrell) is hired by circus owner Max Medici (Danny DeVito).  He’s got two dead-behind -the-eyes children.  Milly (Nico Parker) and Joe (Finley Hobbins) channel all the excitement of a damp dishrag in their performances.  They discover early on that Dumbo can fly.  The cute little guy takes off so frequently for audiences at Medici’s circus that it feels like no big deal.  This catches the attention of V.A. Vandevere (Michael Keaton) an entrepreneur who wants to showcase Dumbo in his latest, larger-than-life amusement park, Dreamland.  The carnival feels like a veiled attack on Disneyland.  Talk about biting the hand that feeds you.  Vandevere and aerial artist Colette Marchant (Eva Green) make the odd pachyderm a star in his circus.  Unfortunately, life under his big top is not all that it seems.

Before I completely tear this sacrilege apart, I want to give Dumbo its due.  The production looks impressive.  Most noticeably, the photo-realistic digital CGI representation of the main character looks convincing.  The set design by Rick Heinrichs and costumes by Colleen Atwood convey a magical fantasy that’s beyond compare.  Visually my eyes were satisfied by the painstaking details.  Additionally having real-life announcer Michael Buffer portray a ringmaster that bellows “LET’S GET READY FOR DUMBOOO!” was a nice touch.  However, I’d have to go back to The Wiz (1978) to find a stunning work of art based on a joyous original that was so inherently empty.  Like that 70s musical adaptation, a lot of obvious care and craft has gone into creating something that looks beautiful.  Yet peel back the meticulous facade and it’s devoid of substance. Dumbo sucked the life out of me.

Despite its distended length, Burton eviscerates everything that made the prototype so great.  Granted I didn’t expect the crows to make an appearance.  Although reclaiming and redeeming those characters would have displayed the kind of confidence I admire in an auteur.  Once upon a time, Tim Burton was that guy.  The witty wordplay from the crows’ song “When I See an Elephant Fly” is still half-heartedly incorporated into the script.  It’s the wittiest dialogue said in the entire film.  But remember the part where Dumbo’s mother spanks an unruly child?  Or where she rocks Dumbo to sleep in her trunk like a baby?  Or Timothy Q. Mouse, Dumbo’s streetwise but supportive confidant?  Or the whimsical elephants on parade number when Dumbo gets drunk?  How about the climactic surprise of a circus crowd that first gasped to see an elephant take flight?  Eliminated, corrupted and mishandled.  All of it.  Point blank and period.  The screenplay by Ehren Kruger (Ghost in the Shell) subverts joy and exploits suffering.  Dumbo is one of the grimmest tales meant for children that I’ve ever seen

03-28-19