The Book of Henry

 photo book_of_henry_zpsgw3gibvv.jpg photo starrating-3andahalfstars.jpgIt’s a poignant melodrama about a terminal illness. Well to clarify, it’s more of a heart-rending tearjerker. No wait, it’s actually crime thriller. I know, it’s an inspirational family drama. Scratch that, it’s really a light comedy. In truth, The Book of Henry is all of these things – a cinematic yo-yo spinning wildly between a plethora of genres. Granted, the screenplay by crime author Gregg Hurwitz (Orphan X) may not follow the rules of how to gradually lead an audience through a saga, but I was absolutely fascinated by where it would take me next.

Henry Carpenter is an 11-year-old genius. He has used his gift to smartly invest in the stock market to build up a stable financial future for his household. In fact, he’s smarter than all of the adults in his life. Number one on that list would have to be his single mother Susan (Naomi Watts). Susan is a waitress, a working mom who writes picture books in her spare time. She’s also a parent to Peter (Jacob Tremblay), Henry’s younger brother. Enter Christina, their next door neighbor. She is Henry’s classmate and a girl with whom Henry has a crush. She’s predictably beautiful, but also very sad. The reveal of her predicament and how Henry tries to help her sets one major plot thread into motion. Henry is also beset with a dilemma of his own. Yes, two major problems that each could be the focus of their own film. I’m being purposefully vague because a big part of the allure is how each contrivance piles on top of another. That sounds like a slam, and it is, but it’s also kind of mesmerizing the way it plays out. Try to look away. You can’t. I was captivated and that counts for something.

The Book of Henry is a fantasy that could only exist in the mind of a writer. It’s a fable that concerns the real world but one invaded by outlandish developments that can feel too implausible to accept. It’s a tale of fabulism.  Lead Jaeden Lieberher has already starred in the acclaimed Midnight Special. Jacob Tremblay was featured in one of the best films of 2015, Room. The opportunity to see these two burgeoning talents in the same production had me sold. They do not disappoint. Add twice Oscar-nominated actress Naomi Watts and you have an unconventional family that had me enrapt. As mother and son, Watts and Lieberher have genuine chemistry. They both starred together in the wonderful St. Vincent. As a character, Susan is a bit intellectually stunted. Ok, that’s putting it mildly but then her son Henry is emotionally deficient. Younger son Peter is simply all around playful sweetness, Together these three form a sensitive triad, a sort of us-against-the-world dynamic that enticed my heart. They’ve got a soul. Buy into their relationship and you’ll buy into the movie.

I usually disregard the critical consensus when reviewing a movie. I’m here to detail my own thoughts. Yet this picture has received some of the most vitriolic reviews of anything this year. Why has this little family film (PG-13 rated for the dark subject matter) received so much hostility from critics? Director Colin Trevorrow burst onto the indie scene with a little gem called Safety Not Guaranteed in 2012. Then followed that indie achievement with the 4th biggest (as of this writing) U.S. blockbuster of all time, 2015’s Jurassic World. Perhaps when someone has a success another feel is unearned, the claws really come out when they stumble. No The Book of Henry isn’t for everyone. The script has got chutzpah for attempting something rather unique. I get that the genre-defying narrative is a bit bananas, but the hate is disproportionate to the movie’s shortcomings. The plot is simply too audacious to dismiss and the drama has too much heart. I was entertained for the entire duration of this chronicle.

06-18-17

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6 Responses to “The Book of Henry”

  1. I too was really surprised by the critical backlash this took. I haven’t seen it of course, but I had to think that with young bright stars like Jaeden Lieberher and Jacob Tremblay, this had to have SOME value in it. I’m glad to read a review that takes some of the negatives and turns them into positives. Sounds like a great many people did not get along well with those tonal shifts?

    • Yeah, the screenwriter has an odd approach that can be a bit jarring. Yet it’s so unique I couldn’t take my eyes off the screen. That counts as entertainment, right?

  2. Jacob Tremblay and Jaeden Lieberher in a movie together, I’m in. I agree there were a lot of different things going on here, but I still enjoyed it. There was a great movie somewhere in between all the stories, but it just didn’t quite get there. 3 stars

  3. For me.. it was the hard left turn it took with them trying to make it seem reasonable that Naomi Watts all of a sudden becomes a sniper/hit woman because of her son’s recordings. I mean.. I just didn’t believe it for one second. The first 1/4 of the film was ok for me.. then after that.. I just sat in disbelief. ha!

    • Her character was kind of intellectually deficient. They showed how she had to ask her son before she did anything having to do with her finances. It was a gradual progression. That disbelief you felt was mine too. I couldn’t look away. I was captivated by how unique it was and that entertained me.

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