The Suicide Squad

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

Director/Producer/Writer/Actor James Gunn is a hyphenate who’s known for doing many things. He famously — and successfully — directed Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) and its Vol. 2 continuation in 2017. After he was temporarily fired by Marvel Studios from Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3, he was snapped up by Warner Bros. to helm this movie.

A superhero lineup of misfits that unite to get a job done is kind of becoming his thing. James Gunn loves The Dirty Dozen (1967) and it shows. That blueprint is utilized again for The Suicide Squad. Note that this standalone sequel has a definite article before the title to distinguish itself from its predecessor. The filmmakers have been distancing themselves from the 2016 entry in interviews but this feels like a Part 2 and a superior follow-up at that. Actors Margot Robbie (Harley Quinn), Joel Kinnaman (Colonel Rick Flag), Jai Courtney (Captain Boomerang), and Viola Davis (Amanda Waller) all return in the same roles. Notably not present is Will Smith as Deadshot. An entirely new character named Bloodsport played by Idris Elba shows up. He’s similarly a gun-toting killer who coincidentally also happens to have an estranged daughter.

At first glance, The Suicide Squad may seem rather similar to Gunn’s Marvel superhero franchise. Instead of Rocket Raccoon, we get Weasel (Sean Gunn). In place of a tree-like humanoid that repeats “I am Groot,” there’s a different oddball with a limited vocabulary named King Shark. The overlap of talent includes Sylvester Stallone who provides his voice. Additionally, Michael Rooker and Pom Klementieff have minor parts. Yet the movies couldn’t be more dissimilar in tone. Guardians was rated PG-13. This is rated R. That’s a hard R predominantly for strong violence and gore.

First and foremost, The Suicide Squad is a comedy. Yes, it’s funny, but only if you embrace Gunn’s cynical point of view that life is disposable. Ah, but how to discuss a picture that inspires essays that rank the various deaths. Don’t get attached to anyone. Everyone is fair game including a false start of a beginning that introduces us to Suicide Squad #1. There’s more than one team. James Gunn doesn’t believe shocks are more potent when doled out sparingly. His nihilistic ethos of “more is more” will test all but his most ardent fans . If you saw this on opening weekend (or immediately viewed when it debuted on HBO Max) you probably loved it. The saga employs a gleeful abandon toward cruelty and death but all for comedic effect. In that spirit, the bloodshed is cartoonish and silly. The action is uniquely absurd for a while. Over two hours, the grotesqueries pile on top of each other and it grows exhausting.

There’s still a great deal here to recommend. Idris Elba and John Cena play Bloodsport and Peacemaker respectively. They’re superheroes on the same side but always at odds. Their constant bickering is amusing. Fresh off of Birds of Prey (2020), Margot Robbie returns as Harley Quin. Third time’s the charm. This is the most I’ve enjoyed her character. “Recently I made a promise to myself that next time I got a boyfriend I’d be on the lookout for red flags…” she declares to justify an unexpected decision. David Dastmalchian as the edgy Polka-Dot Man and Daniela Melchior as surprisingly sweet Ratcatcher 2 are interesting members of the outfit. Their backstories and abilities significantly support the narrative with something this adventure needs more of…heart.

The Suicide Squad has an “everything but the kitchen sink” aesthetic. French poet Paul Valery proclaimed, “A person is a poet if his imagination is stimulated by the difficulties inherent in his art and not if his imagination is dulled by them.” Simply put, the most visionary work comes from figuring out how to invent through the constraints. Tell someone they can’t drop an F-bomb in their picture and they’ll have to devise creative words to circumvent that rule. On the contrary, this chronicle is the product of a filmmaker unrestrained and free to do whatever he wants. It is a violent, bloody, action-packed exhibition. I’ll concede there are some memorable displays. The colorful climax owes a serious debt to 1984’s Ghostbusters. As I sat gobsmacked by the spectacle, I was indeed entertained. So much stuff crammed into this movie that it’s impossible not to be. At least I can say I was never bored.

08-05-21

2 Responses to “The Suicide Squad”

  1. I liked this one too. The first one was so bad. I didn’t expect to enjoy this, but it was fun, aside from all the gore. I got a little Hobbs and Shaw at the beginning and yes, totally Ghostbusters at the end. 3 1/2 ⭐️

    Liked by 1 person

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