No Time to Die

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Daniel Craig doesn’t smile. At least that’s the claim. This is the 5th and final film of the series to star the actor and he has grown progressively despondent with each entry. Hey, I’ve enjoyed his interpretation. Casino Royale (2006) and Skyfall are in my Top 10 of Bond movies. The actor has been reinventing the character ever since he fell head over heels in love with Vesper Lynd (Eva Green) in the iconic Casino Royale. That failed romance haunts him. Despite his ongoing depression, Spectre ended on a happy note. James Bond retired and drove off into the sunset with Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux). He should’ve quit while he was ahead.

In this story (and I’m liberally using the official synopsis), Bond has retired from MI6. He is enjoying a tranquil retirement in Jamaica after leaving active service. Nevertheless, his peace is short-lived as CIA field officer Felix Leiter (Jeffrey Wright) shows up and asks for help. The mission to rescue kidnapped scientist Valdo Obruche (David Dencik) leads Bond on the trail of an enigmatic terrorist named Lyutsifer Safin (Rami Malek) who is armed with Project Heracles, a bioengineered weapon selectively tailored to an individual’s DNA. Lyutsifer is your standard-issue megalomaniac with an affected speech pattern. Actor Rami Malek enunciates each word with a nod toward camp. The confusing target of his evil plan seems to fluctuate, but I think his vendetta is ultimately against SPECTRE, the organization that murdered his family.

James Bond has a long and rich history. The British secret agent was introduced in 1953 by novelist Ian Fleming and adapted to movies starting with Dr. No in 1962. Forget what you knew. James Bond has changed. No Time to Die recasts the lothario as a monogamous family man. Dr. Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux), his pretty love interest from Spectre returns. She’s got a mysterious five-year-old daughter named Mathilde (Lisa-Dorah Sonnet) in tow. Mathilde may have piercing blue eyes, but Madeleine informs him that “she is not his.” Bond visits the grave of Vesper Lynd in the prologue so you know he’s still pining for that woman. I guess Madeleine is the next best thing because he’s devoted to her now. However, Daniel Craig and Lea Seydoux generate as much heated passion as two damp towels in a freezer. These two look more like father and daughter than lovers. As progressive as this Bond is, dating a woman his own age is the one thing that doesn’t change. Side note: Their 17 year age difference isn’t a record gap for the superspy. Carol Bouquet and Roger Moore in For Your Eyes Only were 29 years apart.

No Time to Die subverts the nature of what makes this man tick. Cary Joji Fukunaga (1st season of the HBO series True Detective) directs this long-delayed continuation, taking over for Danny Boyle who left the project in 2018. Screenwriters Neal Purvis and Robert Wade have written seven episodes beginning with The World Is Not Enough (1999). Also contributing to the script is Phoebe Waller-Bridge (BBC Three TV show Fleabag) who was brought in to spice up the dialogue at Daniel Craig’s request. Every woman is a fully realized human being that most definitely does not exist to satiate your lascivious desires. Thank you very much. There’s even a competitive new 007 named Nomi (Lashana Lynch). She has replaced Bond at MI6. He is ostensibly working for the CIA at this point. Their combative rivalry is amusing.

Then there’s the action apex of the entire production. The setpiece recalls the elegance and winking silliness of the past. Bond travels to Cuba. There he is assisted by a sexy CIA operative named Paloma memorably played by Ana de Armas. The ensuing sequence unfolds when they infiltrate a SPECTRE meeting. The two face off in a balletic shootout against a host of various gunmen including Safin’s right-hand man (Dali Benssalah). At one point, Paloma rams the car she’s driving into the structure that corrupt scientist Valdo Obruchev is climbing, causing him and it to collapse onto the car. Ana De Armas outshines Bond. Sadly her appearance is merely a cameo. She steals the show and left me wanting more.

Daniel Craig’s version of 007 has always displayed world-weariness but here his sadness looms large. This is a surprisingly dour affair with the biggest downer of an ending to ever grace this franchise. At two hours and 43 minutes, the 25th entry from Eon Productions is the longest Bond film ever made. It feels like it. The good news is there’s ample opportunity for redeeming highlights. I loved seeing all the familiar faces return: Naomie Harris as Miss Moneypenny, Ben Whishaw as Q, Christoph Waltz as arch-enemy Blofeld (in MI6 custody), and Ralph Fiennes as head of MI6. There are some cool vehicles too. #1 is a scissor-wing plane that folds into a submarine. #2 is the Aston Martin DB5 of course. Cinematic flair has been one of the hallmarks. Oscar-winning director of photography Linus Sandgren (La La Land) significantly contributes to the overall style of the production. The intimate and clean cinematography is a real throwback to the classic era before CGI and shaky-cam. Features like these reminded me why I love these movies. There are flashes of exhilaration buried amongst the melancholy.

10-07-21

4 Responses to “No Time to Die”

  1. Although I enjoyed this a bit more, I do agree with your review. Rami Maleks’ character, to me was laughable. His line delivery was too campy. My favorite part was also, the scene with Ana. Their chemistry was awesome. I wanted more of that. 3 1/2 ⭐️

    Like

  2. Dang everyone is saying how good Ana de Armas is in it and how they wish they could have had more time with her character. I’m glad to see the female characters being elevated into human beings in the Craig era. As much as I love the Connery Bond — and I probably should clarify I am no hardcore feminist or anything, just a guy who thinks people deserve more respect and representation — those early Bond films had a lot of cringe to them. The fact that a woman basically completely whoops Bond’s ass in the most epic way — breaking his heart, leaving him in tatters for multiple movies — is a progressive step for sure!

    I look forward to this one. Hopefully early this week.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Something I learned while writing this review was the large age gaps between James Bond and the “Bond girl”. Honor Blackman arguably played the most iconic Bond girl ever (Pussy Galore) in 1964’s Goldfinger. She was — in fact — 5 years OLDER than Sean Connery when she played the role. An older woman would never happen again in this series.

      Liked by 1 person

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